J. Paine, Architectus.

Method Stipple
Artist D. P. Pariset after Pierre Etienne Falconet
Published Sold by P. Falconet Broad Street Carnaby Market, & Ryland & Bryer Cornhill. Price 2s. c.1769
Dimensions Image 192 x 126 mm, Sheet 443 x 330 mm
Notes James Paine (1717–1789) was an English architect. Essentially a Palladian, early in his career he was Clerk of Works at Nostell Priory, and worked on many other projects in the area including Heath House in the village of Heath in between Nostell Priory and Wakefield. From the 1750s, he had his own practice, and designed many villas, usually consisting of a central building, often with a fine staircase, and two symmetrical wings. The most important house which he was involved with was Kedleston Hall, Derbyshire where he succeeded Matthew Brettingham from 1759 to 1760 and suggested the colonnaded hall, but he was himself displaced by Robert Adam, who altered his designs. At around the same time he designed the very grand stables at Chatsworth House in the same county. He was a favorite arhictect of the powerful Catholic families of the time. In the 1760s he was commissioned to rebuild Worksop Manor for the Duke of Norfolk as well as the new Thorndon Hall (1764–1770) in Essex for Lord Petre and his house on Park Lane, London. From 1770 to 1776, he built New Wardour Castle in Wiltshire. Paine held various posts, some sinecures, in the Office of Works culminating in appointment as one of the two Architects of the Works in 1780 but lost the post in a reorganisation in 1782. He was appointed High Sheriff of Surrey for 1783. His practice declined in his later years as he refused to participate in the Neoclassical fashions established by the Adam brothers. He published much of his own work in his two volumes of Plans, elevations and sections of Noblemen and Gentlemen's Houses (1767 and 1783). His son James Paine (1745–1829) was a sculptor.

D P Pariset (1740 - after 1783). Engraver born in Lyons, and a pupil of Demarteau. Came to London in 1769, and worked for Ryland and later Falconet on a series of portraits of members of the RA. In an advertisement in the 'Mercure de France' of October 1783 (p.142) he announced that he had worked for ten years in England, when he 'a coopéré à quantité d'estampes qui ont fait la réputation des graveurs titulaires' (ie he had worked as an understrapper) and acquired expertise in 'la manière Anglaise'. His prints were being handled by his younger daughter

O'Donoghue 1.I/II

Ex. Col.: Hon. Christopher Lennox-Boyd

Condition: Trimmed to plate mark and mounted on paper.
Framing unmounted
Price £100.00
Stock ID 25455

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