Founders & Benefactors of Pembroke College, with a View of the Buildings &c.

Method Copper engraving
Artist Joseph Skelton after George Vertue
Published Published as the Act directs June 1. 1818. by J. Skelton St Aldates, Oxford
Dimensions Image 191 x 225 mm, Plate 237 x 310 mm, Sheet 327 x 346 mm
Notes A reduced version of the 1744 Oxford Almanack. From 'Oxonia Antiqua Restaurata' by Joseph Skelton. Skelton began publishing parts of this work from 1818 but it was not completed until 1820 and only fully published three years later in 1823.

Joseph Skelton (1781 - 1850) was an English engraver of topographical and antiquarian subjects. He is best-known for his plates in 'Oxonia Antiqua Illustrata' (1823); 'Engraved Illustrations of Antiente Arms and Armour from the Collection at Goodrich Court from the Drawings, and with the Descriptions of Dr. Meyrick' (1830) (2 vols); and Girault's 'Les Beautes de la France' (1850). He settled in France in the latter part of his life and was elected FSA in 1844. His brother William Skelton was also an engraver.

George Vertue (1684-1756) was an antiquary and engraver. He was born in the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, London. Vertue was apprenticed to a silver engraver and later to the Flemish engraver Michael Vandergucht. His early work includes plates after Kneller, whose academy he attended from 1711. Vertue had a deep interest in antiquarian research, and much of his work was devoted to this subject. He also served as the official engraver to the Society of Antiquaries (1717-56). From 1713 onwards, Vertue dedicated his research to the details of the history of British art, which resulted in an extensive collection of notebooks now in the British Library. The contents of which were the basis of Horace Walpole's 1762 'Anecdotes of Painting'. There are approximately five hundred portraits attributed to Vertue, and an equivalent number of published plates which were devoted to antiquarian subjects.
Framing mounted
Price £50.00
Stock ID 46388

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